Posts tagged "menswear"

bitemagazine:

FEATURE | INTERVIEW WITH GHSTS DESIGNER JOSEPH KEEFER

We speak to Joseph Keefer, the man behind Brooklyn’s latest line, GHSTS. Equipped with a pre-existing knowledge in fashion as Robert Geller’s assistant, the American translates his unremitting passion for music into the premiere collection entitled Unmastered. 

What prompted you to start the collection? Is it a case of bringing out an identity of some sort? I wanted to branch out and begin my own line. GHSTS’ identity is parallel to mine and I’m also very driven by DIY and music hence I established the brand myself in the only way I knew how.

What are the inspirations behind the first collection - Unmastered?
The inspiration for the first collection Unmastered was music - music I grew up with listening to and playing - music that inspired me. Mainly revolving around the genres of punk, hardcore and grunge (i.e Nirvana, Fugazi, American Nightmare, Botch). 

Is it a conscious decision on your part by likening them to band t-shirts? If so, why? I designed the t-shirt graphics in a way similar to band t-shirts because they’ve always been my favorite. Band t-shirts have always been so iconic and I wanted to capture that.

Is GHSTS more inspired by music or is it more fashion conscious? GHSTS will always be more driven by music. The idea of the brand is of course to be a fashion brand and to grow in that way, but the roots will always be attached to music.

How do you approach the design process? Does it begin with a text in mind followed by the graphics or is it more organic? The design process for t-shirts has always been the same for me, I get an idea of word, phrase, lyric, or graphic in mind and I build around that. The text, graphic, placement all comes together after.

How much has working as the asst for Robert Geller influenced GHSTS? Or do you regard this as a project or collection that is a complete diversion from your previous works? I’ve been able to learn from Robert about fashion and fashion design more than I could from anywhere else. This has been invaluable. I would say in that way I am inspired by Robert Geller, however the brand GHSTS isn’t inspired by my job with Robert. I have been able to use that knowledge in helping to develop the brand and its course going forward. GHSTS is a project entirely separate from my work at Robert Geller, it’s meant to be seen through its own light as it develops.

What’s next for GHSTS? Are there any future aspirations or desires to branch out the brand even further or are you focused on developing niche tees? What’s next for GHSTS is growing our segments, we want the brand to be more than a t-shirt brand. T-shirts will always remain a strong part of our core but our goal is to be introducing more cut and sew pieces into the line up as we move forward. Currently we are developing a couple of pieces we hope to be able to show soon. We’re taking it slow and not trying to overwhelm ourselves with the project as we want to nurture GHSTS, bring it along slowly and steadily allowing to experience a real successful growth and lifespan.

GHSTS’ premiere collection can be found here

Text: Nadirah Nazaraly/Daniel Griffiths
Images: GHSTS

THANKS BITE!


What my desk currently looks like.

What my desk currently looks like.


No scanner today so I took a quick pic of this sketch.

No scanner today so I took a quick pic of this sketch.


Saturday sketching.

Saturday sketching.


bitemagazine:

Preview #13
BITE Magazine 02 | David Urbanke (feat. Jackson Rado @ RE:QUEST)
Part of our Preview Series ahead of the release of The Power Issue.
Facebook | Twitter

Really happy with this editorial I shot with David. The shoot exclusively features clothing from ALWAYSNEVER NEW YORK

bitemagazine:

Preview #13

BITE Magazine 02 | David Urbanke (feat. Jackson Rado @ RE:QUEST)

Part of our Preview Series ahead of the release of The Power Issue.


Facebook | Twitter

Really happy with this editorial I shot with David. The shoot exclusively features clothing from ALWAYSNEVER NEW YORK


bitemagazine:

BITE MAGAZINE 02 | ROCK CLASSICS

Photographer: David Urbanke Stylist: Joseph Keefer Model: Jackson Rado

As featured on Models.com
Full editorial in BITE Magazine Power/02 Issue. Read online now.

bitemagazine:

BITE MAGAZINE 02 | ROCK CLASSICS

Photographer: David Urbanke
Stylist: Joseph Keefer
Model: Jackson Rado

As featured on Models.com


Full editorial in BITE Magazine Power/02 Issue. Read online now.


#Menswear

Today an article was published discussing the “Oral History of Menswear Blogging and Street Style” the article is interesting but it’s a bit pretentious and a tad narrow minded. The article while shedding light on an arena that is growing every day fails to open up past one single aesthetic, which is simply referred to as “menswear”.

Menswear relates to mens clothing, mens fashion and not just one aesthetic. At the end of the day the guy in the corduroy double breasted blazer, chambray shirt and camo khakis is wearing menswear just as is the guy who’s wearing a leather jacket, hoodie and jeans, and so is the guy in the two button black suit, white shirt and black tie. Thats all menswear. Not just the now so in vogue “heritage” look, based upon “quality” we’re told. Mean while its being made and sold in mass by brands such as J.Crew and others who out source their production to China and similar countries. The guys into the heritage idea are the guys who aren’t buying jeans from Uniqlo, or JCrew but are spending the money on Sugar Canes, Pure Blue Japans, Iron Heart’s etc, jeans produced in small batches by artisan heritage denim factories in Japan and that’s damn cool.

Menswear was exciting in the early part of the 2000’s Helmut Lang, Heidi Slimane, Martin Margiela were all still designing and creating beautiful menswear. Design was inspired and not stale, not just reaching for something so simple, so safe, so accepted as prep/heritage.  There was a sense of energy to so much of what was coming out, young designers like Raf Simons, Rick Owens, Takahiro Miyashita, and more were getting coverage. There was design happening and being celebrated. The press wasn’t so enamored by something so simple, and so surface.

Guys were buying clothes and creating individualistic looks with character even if they weren’t spending top dollar on designer clothing. Streetwear was gaining momentum and brought with it a unique, edgy and exciting aspect to traditional menswear. Guys we’re figuring out their own look and weren’t trying to just fit to one idea. Now so many guys who are into fashion are hard to tell apart from guys who’s girlfriends shop for them at the local Abercrombie or Macy’s. It’s not about a dark avant garde aesthetic vs a classic American prep (or blue collar sometimes combined) aesthetic, it’s about being an individual. It’s about being open minded, its about finding your self, its about being able to really identify with something before you buy it and blog about it. What’s so unique and amazing about the same plaid shirt that is being produced at a 10,000 piece volume for 250 storefronts world wide? How do you connect with it?

It’s just too bad so many of the amazing designers out there making menswear that is circle peg to the square hole of what is now popular and celebrated. The overwhelming support and coverage of one aspect of menswear kind of sucks. It’s white washing a whole community of designers out there from other parts of the world inspired by something other than New England. I understand these things go in cycles and what not but its just astounding how so much attention is focused on this one element of menswear. Maybe I need to get some pop color socks and I’ll understand a bit better. 


rawkblog-deactivated20131111 said: Hi, Joseph -- I wrote the menswear blogging article. It wasn't an article about menswear trends, per se, but an article about the blogosphere that's developed around them. That's happened in the last few years, and I'm sure you'd find it hard to argue that it's been centered around heritage and now Italian suiting. You'll note the article does cover a range of menswear voices -- it has WIWT bloggers and classicists as well as trend-watchers. Thanks for the feedback!

Hi David - 

I really appreciate you taking the time to both read and respond to my post in reference to your article on GQ.com.  I realize the article is about the blogosphere thats developed around menswear trends. In my post I was speaking of menswear trends that where/are still happening that aren’t receiving any coverage via any of the bloggers used in the article. 

I just still feel there is so much more out there that is menswear that is so strong, so well designed, so well made, and so under appreciated by the new blitz of “menswear” So much so easily dismissed it’s just too bad. It’s quite difficult for me to not argue that its based around heritage when so many faces and names involved favor/celebrate that look.

There is room for more than one aesthetic in menswear blogging and streetstyle. Forums like superfuture prove that every day, for years now. It’s also not as polarizing as styleforum (heritage) or stylezeitgeist(avantgarde). It’s a more well rounded forum with denim guys/heritage guys/avant garde guys/streetwear guys. Thousands of members on there all playing apart in menswear some way and all embracing different aesthetics. Raf Simons sweater with Nike Frees or Iron Hearts with Common Projects, and a J.Crew shirt etc. I also see the great variety in menswear when flipping through street style shots from Men’s Non No, Men’s Fudge both of Japan but capturing images regularly in New York, London, Paris, Tokyo, etc. 

At the end of the day we’re all entitled to our opinions, and our views. I for one would just like to see a more well rounded menswear outlook provided by such a reputable source such as GQ. Everyday I see interesting and cool menswear out on the street and on the internet, it’s really so much more than this one aesthetic. I appreciate the work that went into your article, your taking time to read my post, and your response. 


can’t help but wear them.

can’t help but wear them.


bostonroll:

Raf Simons spring 2012 backstage
via hapsical

well, i need this.

bostonroll:

Raf Simons spring 2012 backstage

via hapsical

well, i need this.


Early morning sketching.

Early morning sketching.


bostonroll:

Robert Geller fall 2010 Leather Jacket
UNFFFFFFFFFFFF

 I wear this jacket too often, I feel bad for mine.

bostonroll:

Robert Geller fall 2010 Leather Jacket

UNFFFFFFFFFFFF

 I wear this jacket too often, I feel bad for mine.


More ball point pen sketching

More ball point pen sketching


Lost image from “Unmastered” GHSTS lookbook, shot by Lauren Keefe, styled by Joseph Keefer. Featuring Boston Roll

Lost image from “Unmastered” GHSTS lookbook, shot by Lauren Keefe, styled by Joseph Keefer. Featuring Boston Roll


Flat sketch project.

Flat sketch project.